tiramisun:

my most pathetic game over : crushed to death by a coffee table, and… killed by… my own jump… ? (i’m still confused by this one)

Posted September 23, 2014 @ 02:01 VIA - SOURCE
Posted September 22, 2014 @ 23:53 VIA - SOURCE
tt-vision:

so, how’s that renegade apostate life working out for you
from the last suggestion bunch

tt-vision:

so, how’s that renegade apostate life working out for you

from the last suggestion bunch

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 22:01 VIA - SOURCE
Posted September 22, 2014 @ 20:48 VIA - SOURCE

oh no. I’m writing a thing about my PCs and their mabari and making myself sad, because I forgot about the imprinting and now I can’t stop thinking about what happens to the dog if the warden dies killing the archdemon.

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 20:21
Posted September 22, 2014 @ 20:00 VIA - SOURCE
Posted September 22, 2014 @ 18:00 VIA
naominovik:

ximen:

potofsoup:

tenyearsapeasant:

So, our dad wrote a book about the ten years he spent in the countryside of Jiangxi province during the Chinese Cultural Revolution.  It’s a series of small stories in Chinese.  Here we will attempt to translate them into English.  Our goal is to post a new translation every 2 weeks.
If you already read Chinese, you can download the original book at his website.

Apologies for the not-fandom post, but in case you’re interested in short stories about Chinese village life during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, my brother and I are starting to translate our dad’s book. We’ll be posting 3k words every 2 weeks or so. I just translated the foreword.Anyway, follow tenyearsapeasant if it’s something of interest???(Sorry no sad boys kissing. None. My mom does show up though. And my dad almost dies 3 times. There’s also a lot of tractors.)

I’ve heard a lot of these stories from potofsoup over the years and they are always interesting.
If you haven’t studied Chinese history, you might not know that during the Cultural Revolution, millions of teenagers were sent out of the cities and into the countryside, where they were supposed to learn from the peasants. One day you’re in high school, then suddenly you’re packing up, leaving your family, and moving out to the boonies to try and be a farmer. (Admittedly, the “in high school” part wasn’t exactly normal either, unless you too can denounce and possibly kill your high school teachers as class traitors if they assign too much homework.) Anyway, these teenagers had to somehow learn enough farming to keep themselves alive, and also avoid political pitfalls. When they had been in 10th grade not long before. They gave up their urban residence permits when they left, so they couldn’t move back to the cities— it was illegal, it would have marked them as traitors and made them subject to mob violence, even if they could avoid arrest, and since urban food was rationed and only available for people who held urban residence permits, they would have starved anyway. 
Ten years later, these no-longer-teenagers were allowed back into the cities, and they had to try and figure out what to do with their lives. For many of them, it was their first chance to see their parents in a decade. They were now in their twenties, with little or no high school education or job training (except for farming) in a country that was rapidly removing its social safety net. For anyone to pull together a successful career out of this is impressive, and I am constantly amazed by all the people I know from this generation who have managed to become successful academics, educators, and business owners. potofsoup's mom is an expert in math education, and she and potofsoup's dad run a Chinese school and textbook empire. They are cool people, and if you are at all interested in modern Chinese history, OR just stories of smart people in a pretty crazy situation, you should definitely follow this tumblr. 

This sounds amazingly cool and I can’t wait to read more of it. 

naominovik:

ximen:

potofsoup:

tenyearsapeasant:

So, our dad wrote a book about the ten years he spent in the countryside of Jiangxi province during the Chinese Cultural Revolution.  It’s a series of small stories in Chinese.  Here we will attempt to translate them into English.  Our goal is to post a new translation every 2 weeks.

If you already read Chinese, you can download the original book at his website.

Apologies for the not-fandom post, but in case you’re interested in short stories about Chinese village life during the Chinese Cultural Revolution, my brother and I are starting to translate our dad’s book. We’ll be posting 3k words every 2 weeks or so. I just translated the foreword.

Anyway, follow tenyearsapeasant if it’s something of interest???

(Sorry no sad boys kissing. None. My mom does show up though. And my dad almost dies 3 times. There’s also a lot of tractors.)

I’ve heard a lot of these stories from potofsoup over the years and they are always interesting.

If you haven’t studied Chinese history, you might not know that during the Cultural Revolution, millions of teenagers were sent out of the cities and into the countryside, where they were supposed to learn from the peasants. One day you’re in high school, then suddenly you’re packing up, leaving your family, and moving out to the boonies to try and be a farmer. (Admittedly, the “in high school” part wasn’t exactly normal either, unless you too can denounce and possibly kill your high school teachers as class traitors if they assign too much homework.) Anyway, these teenagers had to somehow learn enough farming to keep themselves alive, and also avoid political pitfalls. When they had been in 10th grade not long before. They gave up their urban residence permits when they left, so they couldn’t move back to the cities— it was illegal, it would have marked them as traitors and made them subject to mob violence, even if they could avoid arrest, and since urban food was rationed and only available for people who held urban residence permits, they would have starved anyway. 

Ten years later, these no-longer-teenagers were allowed back into the cities, and they had to try and figure out what to do with their lives. For many of them, it was their first chance to see their parents in a decade. They were now in their twenties, with little or no high school education or job training (except for farming) in a country that was rapidly removing its social safety net. For anyone to pull together a successful career out of this is impressive, and I am constantly amazed by all the people I know from this generation who have managed to become successful academics, educators, and business owners. potofsoup's mom is an expert in math education, and she and potofsoup's dad run a Chinese school and textbook empire. They are cool people, and if you are at all interested in modern Chinese history, OR just stories of smart people in a pretty crazy situation, you should definitely follow this tumblr. 

This sounds amazingly cool and I can’t wait to read more of it. 

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 16:00 VIA - SOURCE

actualfairyboy:

tardis-mind-palace:

w-for-wumbo:

mylourrydiary:

hlil:

Can u believe there are plants that are illegal
Plants

Can you believe there is love that is illegal
Love

can you believe it’s not butter
butter

the fact that Tumblr can fit weed, bestiality and diary products all into one post doesn’t even phase me anymore

i really dont think they meant bestiality

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 15:38 VIA - SOURCE

ladysmaragdina replied to your post: “jesus fucking christ, why is it so hard to find a fucking conversation…”:
I JUST LOADED UP ORIGINS AFTER A LONG BOUT OF DA2 AND IT WAS SO GODDAMN FRUSTRATING FOR EXACTLY THIS REASON I don’t care if I can’t talk or move my lips just LET ME LOOK AT MORE THAN THE BACK OF MY HEAD

I know there are conversations where you get a long look at your expressionless face and dead, empty eyes while it waits for you to make a choice, but I cannot for the life of me remember when they occur.

I spent a fucking hour trying to get this character’s looks right in the CC, the least you can do is show it to me in something other than the awful bloody romance scenes.

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 15:34

all that frustration and re-installation and mod tweaking just to get a couple of screenshots of each of them and to remember what their gd dogs were called.

(…who am I kidding, I am totally going to do a replay.)

dog names!

Read More

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 15:25

jesus fucking christ, why is it so hard to find a fucking conversation in DAO that will show your warden’s face. 

there’s only so much that staring intently at walls can do for me, and these screenshots aren’t going to take themselves.

(THAT’S A JOKE BC THEY DO TAKE THEMSELVES BUT USUALLY OF THE WARDEN’S BACK OR LIKE HALF THEIR FACE BEHIND ANOTHER CHARACTER HA HA FUCK ME)

this is why I like Hawke, in DA2 it actually feels like there’s a fucking point to the character creator.

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 14:52
Posted September 22, 2014 @ 14:00 VIA - SOURCE

I need a greeting card for “you are a dear friend and I love you a lot, but jesus christ your taste in bioware love interests sucks”.

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 12:50

busket:

sixpenceee:

alloursongswillbelullabies:

sixpenceee:

Doesn’t that look beautiful?

Like something you’d find on one of those soft/pale/rosy/grunge blogs? 

Well nothing too rosy on my blog. 

The Bolton Strid in England is one of the most innocent looking streams. 

Though it looks like you could just hop across the rocks, but if you miss you will die for sure. It packs very rapid currents just a couple of feet below its surface. No one really knows how deep it really is. Nobody who has ever fallen into the Strid has survived. It has a 100% fatality rate.

It’s always the things I google expecting to be false that wind up being horribly true.

SOURCE

"It’s relatively common for people to assume they can jump the creek, walk across its stones or even wade through it (again, just looking at it, the Strid really seems to be only knee-deep in places, and certainly not the instant, precipitous drop into a watery grave that it is). Most of the time, they never even find the body. Which means there are just dozens of corpses down there, pinned to the walls of the underground chasms, waiting for you to join them…"

Posted September 22, 2014 @ 12:00 VIA - SOURCE